Contest Category : President-elect

FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Total votes for the Contest "President-elect" : 0

FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Shannon Speed

Category : President-elect
Chokma! I am truly honored to stand for NAISA President. I am Chickasaw and Choctaw, and I am a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. I serve as Director of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC) at UCLA, on Tongva traditional land, where I am also an Associate Professor of Gender Studies and Anthropology. I was trained in hemispheric indigenous studies at UC Davis, and my work bridges disciplinary and geographic boundaries in the Americas. My work in the last two and a half decades has focused on Mexico, Central America, and the U.S., on issues of indigenous autonomy, sovereignty, gender, neoliberalism, violence, migration, and collaborative research. I recently completed a book manuscript entitled, “Incarcerated Stories: Indigenous Women Migrants and the Settler Capitalist State” (forthcoming UNC Press Critical Indigeneities Series). My next (proposed) project is with the Chickasaw Nation.   Candidate Statement: I am strongly committed to NAISA as our Native professional association, as my record of service reflects. I have attended all but two of the meetings since NAISA’s inception. In 2010, I helped co-found the Abiayala Working Group, to assist Council in addressing barriers to the participation of our indigenous colleagues from Latin America. Abiayala was NAISA’s first, and remains its only, official working group. In 2014, I served as Chair of the Host Committee when we brought the annual meeting to UT Austin. The center I now direct, the AISC at UCLA, is hosting this year’s conference in Los Angeles. I have served on NAISA Council from 2015 to the present (term ending May 2018). I hope to be able to continue this trajectory of service as president of NAISA. If elected, I would continue to build on NAISA’s great strengths in community-engaged research and knowledge production with a global theoretical reach. Since its founding, through the annual meetings and the NAIS journal, NAISA has played a decisive role in reshaping and invigorating the discipline of Native Studies. As president, I would humbly seek to continue the groundbreaking work carried out by our past presidents and councilmembers. I would also endeavor to expand our development efforts, seeking funding to grow our support for graduate student, community, and international participation. I will work to foster continued dialogue, not just across north-south borders, but across the Pacific, Atlantic, and beyond. In addition, through its public statements, NAISA Council has spoken to pressing issues affecting Native individuals and communities. I would encourage and expand (as appropriate) this important form of public engagement. In short, I will continue to uphold and strengthen NAISA’s inclusive mission of locally grounded, publicly engaged, and globally relevant scholarship in Native Studies.   Chokma’shki/Thank you for considering my potential to lead the association.

Rob Innes

Category : President-elect
Robert (Rob) Alexander Innes is a member of Cowessess First Nation and an associate professor in the department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan.  He is the author of Elder Brother and the Law of the People: Contemporary Kinship and Cowessess First Nation (University of Manitoba Press, 2013) and the co-editor, along with Kim Anderson, of Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration (University of Manitoba Press, 2015). He has published in the American Indian Quarterly, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Oral History Forum, and Aboriginal Policy Studies.  Rob was the editor of the Native Studies Review for five years, guest editor of the American Indian Culture and Research Journal special issue on “New Interpretations in Cultural Preservation, Revitalization, and Persistence” and co-editor with Winona Wheeler for a special issue of the Engaged Scholars Journal on Indigenous community engagement.  Rob’s current research looks at strategies some Indigenous men employ to counteract their internalization of white supremacist, heteronormative, patriarchal ideals.  He has been a faculty member in the department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Saskatchewan since 2007 and has filled various administrative roles including first year course coordinator, undergraduate chair, graduate chair, and acting head, and will become department head in July 2018. Rob served on the original NAISA council for a one-year term appointment in 2009/10.   He was also the chair of the organizing committee for the NAISA Annual Meeting that took place in Saskatoon in 2013. That conference was awarded the 2014 Saskatoon Shines! Leadership Award from the City of Saskatoon.   Candidate Statement: I was honoured that I was asked to run for the position of president-elect for the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.  I obtained my MA in Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan and my PhD in American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona, as well as a minor in Aboriginal Studies at the University of Toronto.  My training as an Indigenous Studies scholar, reflects my deep commitment to Indigenous Studies as a discipline, and to NAISA as an organization.   NAISA has seen tremendous growth since those initial conferences in Oklahoma and Georgia, showing the growth in Indigenous Studies as a discipline and an interest in Indigenous issues more generally.  NAISA has been instrumental in bringing together researchers from various disciplines, research areas, and geographic locations to meet, discuss and eventually collaborate on projects. The number of edited anthologies that have emerged from NAISA annual meetings evidences the collaboration in research and writing that NAISA has generated.  We are fortunate that even though NAISA has grown tremendously over the last decade, for many it still generates the same level of excitement as those first gatherings.  As NAISA continues to grow, I will follow in the footsteps of past executives and council members to work to maintain the type of organization that NAISA membership have come to expect and to work collaboratively to bring new ideas that can enhance the experiences of our members while acting to strengthen our discipline that emphasizes community engaged research and writing in support of our communities and challenges the structures that marginalize and oppress our people.