Assistant Professor – Native American Studies

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The Department of Native American Studies at the University of New Mexico invites applications for an Assistant Professor position to begin in August 2022. This is a full-time, tenure-track position with specialization in Indigenous Community Sustainability (focus on health & wellbeing). Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Native American Studies, Indigenous Studies, or a related field by date of appointment. For best consideration, all application materials must be received by October 8, 2021.
Applications must demonstrate evidence of research on Native Nation sustainable community building with focused expertise on holistic health factors affecting communities. This focused expertise aligns with the mission of NAS’s degree programs and the current needs of Native Nations in New Mexico and beyond. This faculty position will work with Native and New Mexico communities in helping to facilitate community-engaged research projects designed for sustainable development. NAS defines “holistic health” in broad terms and is inclusive of community wellbeing and wellness and all the factors that impact wellbeing, such as the environment, economics, policies, arts, languages, and so on.
The new faculty member will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in leadership, theory, methodologies, Native Nation building, and in their specialty or area of expertise. They will also mentor and supervise master’s degree students, eventual Ph.D. students, and contribute to core, required undergraduate and graduate courses.
https://unm.csod.com/ux/ats/careersite/18/home/requisition/17317?c=unm
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